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Darlene Campbell
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« on: March 12, 2004, 08:41:00 AM »

New evidence has come to light regarding Jacob Teague, father of Margaret Teague - wife of David Smith.

It was long considered that Jacob Teague was from Virginia/North Carolina and was married to Lydia Barnes. Although that Jacob Teague did indeed exist, it now seems apparent that this Jacob Teague was not the father to Margaret, nor the man who came to Gaspe.

Regarding the family of Jacob Teague and Lydia Barnes, the places of birth of each of their children was always in the USA during the 1780's and 1790's. Their children’s names did not remotely correspond to those that we know from the Gaspe Coast.  Lastly, most researchers assume that Jacob Teague returned to the USA from New Carlisle to take over his father's property around 1800 while suggesting that there was starvation going on in New Carlisle.  It was not until the summer of 1816 that there were no crops due to the massive volcanic explosion that occurred that year in Indonesia and which affected the entire Atlantic seaboard including Maine and some of the other states

Thanks to a fellow genealogist, Karen Ross, a document has come to light that would lend credence to our theory.  In a land petition of Duncan McRae of Hopetown, dated August 3, 1820, it is stated:

"Opposition by David Smith Sr. of Hope Township for the above mentioned Lot No 12 said apparent acting in this behalf as for himself? For his wife Margaret Tegg, who claimed the said land by right of inheritance from her mother Margaret Weaver."

On the basis of this document and through considerable research done by Earle Irvine and myself, we have concluded that the first wife of Jacob Teague was Margaret Weaver who was born around 1746 possibly at German Flats, New York. She married Jacob Teague around 1767 and had possibly six children before 1775. She and Jacob eventually found their way to the Gaspe Coast where Margaret died before 1796 probably in Shigawake, Quebec. By this time, her eldest daughters had married. After the death of their mother, the youngest daughter, Anne, moved with her father to Bathurst, Gloucester County, New Brunswick where he married a French girl, Charlotte Thebault, the youngest daughter of Mathurin Thebault and Catherine Duval. A few days before he married Catherine, he had baptised his daughter Anne, age 10 years probably as a requirement of the church before he could marry Charlotte Thebault.  . It is not clear whether any children resulted from this marriage or not but there was a Bernard Teague who claimed land in York County in 1866 who may possibly be a son as well as a Daniel Teague who petitioned for land in 1820 and in 1828 in Kings County, N.B. Also, there was a David Teague who petitioned for land in Gloucester County, N.B. in 1847.

Jacob Teague was not really a devout Catholic. He died suddenly during the winter of 1823-1824, and it couldn't be decided whether or not he should be buried in the Catholic Cemetery. His family desired it, but the missionary referred to him as the "old German" ...married Catholic, but who hadn't been to confession since. His parents said that he didn't fish anyone. I didn't take it upon myself to give him the church burial because he died alone, and we can assume he could have asked for a priest had he wished to die otherwise. He'll be buried at his home".  His widow remarried in 1834, in Paspebiac, to Jean Baptiste Bourdignan, a native of the parish of Saint-Roch of Quebec.

Jacob had several careers and changed his location of residence frequently. He was a farmer in New York, carpenter in New Carlisle, a fisherman at Jacquet River, and Blacksmith in Nipisiquit. He also lived in Beresford, near the Grant Stream to be specific. He would finish his days in the civil parish of New Bandon, where he left his name to a brook -Teagues Brook. In 1840, some 16 years after his death, twelve pounds in funds were earmarked by the New Brunswick government to finish the bridge over Teague's Brook. Teague's Brook drains into the Bay of Chaleur from Teague Lake. According to the Anglican Gloucester County deaths records of Wm. LeB. McKiel, Missionary, two brothers, Charles Scott, aged 24 and Robert Scott, aged 14, were buried at the same time, 5th December 1864, in the same grave in the same graveyard of St. George's Church, Bathurst. They were drowned by falling through the ice in Teague's Lake.
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William Flowers
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« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2004, 12:29:06 PM »

Darlene,

Your Teague work is a fine piece of genealogy; congratulations to both you and Earle Irvine.

In addition to the documents you mentioned, Jacob Teague, Cooper, is also on the 1784 Paspébiac Lot Drawing List, along with his wife, a 13 year-old son, and daughters: 15, 12, 11, and 10.  (Andrew Teague, Drummer, perhaps a brother or son, was the next person on the lot drawing list. Andrew also appears on the 1786 muster on Lot 57)

In 1786 Jacob Teague of New Carlisle also filed a supporting affadavit for the loyalist claim of Mary Bebee Pearson, testifying that her former husband, Joshua Beebe, had lost 300 acres on the Susquehanna River.

You quote from what appears to be the journal of a missionary in 1823-24.  Could you tell us more about that journal?
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Darlene Campbell
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« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2004, 02:43:33 PM »

Sources:                                                                                            

-Archives of bishop of Three Rivers. Letter from Leduc 25.08.1824.
-Parish Register of Bathurst West of Caraquet and Carleton (Quebec).
-Report of the Bureau of Archives for province of Ontario (1904), p.332
-Donat Robichaud. Le Petit Nepisiquit (1984), p.270 and 271

Reference: Dictionnaire Biographique du Nord-Est du N.B.

From Guide to Biographies
Jacob Teague
Ref: MC1856
quatrieme cahier
Comment: Dictionnaire Biographique

 Teague, Jacob (ca 1740-1824), Loyaliste

D'origine allemande, Jacob Teague naquit a German Flatts sur the riviere Mohawk dans l'etat de New York (Etats-Unis). En 1767, il acheta d'Augustin Prevost, une ferme de 200 acres, qui lui fut confisquee par le gouvernement americain. Au declenchement de la Revolution americaine, il refusa de se joindre aux patriotes et se refugia a Niagara (New York), en 1777. C'est la qu'il s'enrola dans les troupes loyalistes des Rangers avec lesquelles il servit pendant deux ans sous le commandant Butler. Il se joignit ensuite au regiment de Sir John Johnson, avec lequel il demeura jusqu'a la fin de la querre de l'independence. En 1783, il fit partie du groupe de Loyalistes qui  vinrent s'etablir a la baie des Chaleurs. Il demeura d'abord a Mal-Baie (Quebec), puis a New Carlisle (Quebec) ou le gouvernment lui conceda un lot de terre de 300 acres.

Jacob Teague, alais Jacques Taigle, epousa en premieres noces aux Etats-Unis, Margaret Wever. C'est probablement apres le deces de celle-ci que Jacob vint s'etablir a Bathurst ou il epousa le 19 septembre 1796, Charlotte Thebault, fille mineure de Mathurin Thebault et de Catherine Duval. Quelques jours auparavant, il avait fait baptiser sa fille Anne, agee de 10 ans.

Jacob pratiqua plusieurs metiers et changea de lieu de residence assez frequemment. Ainsi on le retrouve fermier a New York, menulsier a New Carlisle, pecheur a la riviere a Jacquet et forgeron a Nipisquit. Il demeura egalement a Beresford, plus precisement au ruisseau Grant. Il alla termier ses jours dans la paroisse civile de New Bandon ou il laissa son nom a un ruisseau, le Teagues Brook.

Jacob Teague ne fut pas un catholique des plus pratiquants. Il mourut subitement au cours de l'hiver 1823-1824, et on ne savait pas si on devait l'inhumer dans le cimetiere catholique ou non. Sa famille le desirait, mais le missionnaire se refera a l'eveque en ces termes: Ce "vieil allemand...marie jadis catholique, mais qui ne s'etait confesse depuis. Ses parents disent qu'il ne pechait plus. Je n'ai pas pris sur moi de lui donner la sepulture ecclesiastique, quoiqu'il soit mort subitement, et qu'on puisse charitablement croire qu'il aurait pu demande un pretre, s'il fut mort autrement. Il est enterre chez lui". Sa veuve se remaria a Paspebiac en 1834 avec Jean-Baptiste Bourdignan, natif de la paroisse de Saint-Roch de Quebec.

The English version of the above document

Of German descent, Jacob Teague was born in German Flatts on the Mohawk River, in the State of New York (United States). In 1767, he bought from Augustin Prevost, a farm of 200 acres, that was confiscated from him by the American government. At the rise of the American Revolution, he refused  to join with the Patriots and took refuge in Niagara, (New York), in 1777. It was there that he enrolled  with the loyalist troops of the Rangers, with which he served for two years under the "Commandent"  Butler. He then joined the regiment of Sir John Johnson, with which he stayed until the end of the War of Independence. In 1783, he was part of a group of Loyalists that became established in the "Baie des  Chaleurs" He then moved to Mal-Baie (Quebec), then New Carlisle (Quebec), where the government  gave him a 300 acres lot of land.

Jacob Teague, aka Jacques Taigle, married Margaret Wever in the United States. It was probably after  her death that Jacob came to Bathurst where, on the 19th of September, 1796, he married Charlotte Thebault, the youngest daughter of Mathurin Thebault and Catherine Duval . A few days before he married Catherine Thebeau,  he had  baptised his daughter Anne, age 10 years.

Jacob had several careers and changed his location of residence frequently. He was a  farmer in New York, carpenter in New Carlisle, a fisherman at the Jacquet River, and Blacksmith in  Nipisiquit. He also lived in Beresford, near the Grant stream to be specific. He would finish his days in  the civil parish of New Bandon, where he left his name to a brook-Teagues Brook.

Jacob Teague was not really a devout catholic. He died suddenly during the winter of 1823-1824, and it couldn't be decided whether or not he should be buried in the Catholic Cemetery. His family desired it,  but the missionary referred to him as the "old German"....married Catholic, but who hadn't been to  confession since. His parents said that he didn't fish anyone. I didn't take it upon myself to give him the  church burial because he died alone, and we can assume he could have asked for a priest had he  wished to died otherwise. He'll be buried at his home" His widow remarried in 1834, in Paspebiac, to  Jean Baptiste Bourdignan, a native of the parish of Saint-Roch of Quebec.

Note: This is not an official translation of the original document but I believe that it is fairly accurate.

From the Grantbook Database:

Jacob Teague and 28 others were granted land at Alnwick, Northumberland County, N.B. in 1812 (Vol. F, Page 97, Grant # 615), some 12 years before his death. The total land grant, a tract of land almost six miles long and one and a half miles deep, encompassed some 6160 acres, and extended from the Bass River to Janeville. It was at Janeville, some eleven miles east of Bathurst, that Jacob Teague had his 275 acres of land which was located near the intersection of roadways 11 and 340. A brook called Teague's Brook ran through his property and emptied into the Bay of Chaleur. The origin of the brook was Teague's Lake

How I currently see the family of Jacob Teague can be found in my online database.
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Hazel Shearer
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« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2007, 10:02:10 PM »

Darlene and Bill,

Found this little tidbit tonight...

http://www.canlii.org/eliisa/highlight.do?text=tague&language=en&searchTitle=R.S.N.B.+1973%2C+c.+T-3&path=/nb/laws/sta/t-3/20070117/whole.html

Territorial Division Act, R.S.N.B. 1973, c. T-3


(b) BATHURST PARISH.- Beginning at a point in the shoreline of the Chaleur Bay where the same is
intersected by the eastern prolongation of the south limit of Lot Number One, granted to Simon Arceneau;
thence in a westerly direction along said prolongation, said limit of said lot and the western prolongation
of same to the most northern angle of Northumberland County; thence in a southeasterly and northeasterly
direction following the Gloucester-Northumberland County line to a point in the Canadian National Railways;
thence in a northerly direction along said railway to a point where the same is intersected by the western
prolongation of the south limit of lots lettered A and B, granted to John Porter, said lots situated on
both sides of the Highway 8; thence in an easterly direction along said prolongation, said limit of said
lots and the eastern prolongation of same to a point in the west limit of a seven thousand, seven hundred
and fifty acre tract, granted to Henry H. Swinny, situated on the head of the Big Tracadie River; thence in
a southerly direction along said limit of said grant and its southern prolongation to a point in the north
limit of Tier one north, Allardville East; thence in an easterly direction along said limit of Allardville
East to a point where the same is intersected by the southern prolongation of the east limit of Lot Number
twenty-nine, granted to Jacob Tague, said lot fronting on the Chaleur Bay at the mouth of Teagues Brook;
thence in a northerly direction along said prolongation and said limit of said lot to a point in the shore
line of Chaleur Bay; and thence following the various courses of said shoreline to the place of beginning.
Including all islands in front thereof.

Hazel
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William Flowers
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« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2007, 10:32:28 AM »

Thanks for this addition about Jacob Teague!
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William Flowers
Hazel Shearer
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« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2007, 01:42:15 PM »

New Brunswick Genealogical Society, Inc.

First Families - http://www.nbgs.ca/firstfamilies.html

TEAGUE: James or Jacob Teague b. - , d. c1823: came from Tryon County,NY to Gaspésie, Québec as a Loyalist: moved to NB about 1812 and settled at
Beresford, Gloucester County: he married (1st) Marie Frigau: m. (2nd) 19 Sep 1796 Charlotte Thébeau d/o Mathurin Thébeau and Catherine Duval:

Children:
1) David Teague :
2) Sarah Teague :
3) Charlotte or Catherine Teague married 21 Oct 1819 Julien Loiselle of
Paspébiac, Québec:
4) Nicolas Teague bp. in Oct 1801:
5) Pierre Teague bp. 14 Jul 1805:
6) Joseph Teague b. 15 Jun 1805:
7) Jean-Baptist Teague b. 15 Nov 1812:
Cool Anne Teague.

Source: MC80/995 Donat Robichaud’s Beresford: Le petit Nipisiguit, pages 270-271.
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William Flowers
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« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2008, 05:33:00 PM »

This is an excerpt from an article entitled, Loyalist Plantations on the Susquehanna, by J. Kelsey Jones and published by the Bradford County Historical Society of Towanda, Pennsylvania, which appeared on the Susquehanna Loyalists listserv today:

"In addition, there were Loyalist families who did not appear on the
assessment lists and they included Jacob Anguish and wife Elisabeth,
Redman Berry who is related to have been a tenant of the Pawling
family at Wyalusing, James Forsyth and wife Eunice at Wyalusing,
Philip Fox and Catherine Lamar at Terrytown, John Lord at Sheshequin,
Joseph Page a tenant of the Pawling family at Wyalusing, Thomas Silk,
Jacob Sipes and Annatje Schauers (Showers) at Macedonia, George
Stewart and Mary Depue, Jacob Teague and Anna Margretha Weaver on
Tagues Creek near Tunkhannock,
[bold added for emphasis] Parshall
Terry, Jr., John Young."

« Last Edit: December 02, 2008, 06:05:11 PM by William Flowers » Logged

William Flowers
William Flowers
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« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2009, 10:41:39 AM »

This is an excerpt from an article entitled, Loyalist Plantations on the Susquehanna, by J. Kelsey Jones and published by the Bradford County Historical Society of Towanda, Pennsylvania, which appeared on the Susquehanna Loyalists listserv today:

"In addition, there were Loyalist families who did not appear on the
assessment lists and they included Jacob Anguish and wife Elisabeth,
Redman Berry who is related to have been a tenant of the Pawling
family at Wyalusing, James Forsyth and wife Eunice at Wyalusing,
Philip Fox and Catherine Lamar at Terrytown, John Lord at Sheshequin,
Joseph Page a tenant of the Pawling family at Wyalusing, Thomas Silk,
Jacob Sipes and Annatje Schauers (Showers) at Macedonia, George
Stewart and Mary Depue, Jacob Teague and Anna Margretha Weaver on
Tagues Creek near Tunkhannock,
[bold added for emphasis] Parshall
Terry, Jr., John Young."



I'm adding the following document in support of the J. Kelsey Jones article quoted above.  This is the 1776 "Up the River" list referring to the Susquehanna River in Pennsylvania. The general area was referred to as the Wyoming Valley. On this attached list note the Secords, all brothers to Mary Secord Beebe Pearson of New Carlisle. Joshua Beebe was the husband of Mary Secord. Jacob Tage appears right in the middle of this Secord/Beebe list. Many on this list were also in Butler's Rangers, a famous Loyalist unit.

It is obvious, then, that if Margaret Weaver was one of Jacob Teague's wives, and there is certainly evidence for that in the Darlene Campbell piece in this thread, then Jacob Teague was in the Wyoming Valley in 1776.


* Up-the-River-1776-p1.jpg (39.05 KB, 531x880 - viewed 1004 times.)
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William Flowers
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« Reply #8 on: September 25, 2009, 06:13:18 PM »

I suppose now the question is "How did he come to be here, at this time?" There was a lot going on then. Was he a Pennamite? Associated with the Susquehannah Company? None of the above? I know, he probably really was from the Mohawk Valley. But still......

Thanks Bill, this is intriguing. (and great)
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William Flowers
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« Reply #9 on: September 26, 2009, 06:31:28 AM »

I suppose now the question is "How did he come to be here, at this time?" There was a lot going on then. Was he a Pennamite? Associated with the Susquehannah Company? None of the above? I know, he probably really was from the Mohawk Valley. But still......

Thanks Bill, this is intriguing. (and great)

I think it unlikely that Jacob Teague was either a Pennamite or had land under the Susquehannah Company. Rather, I think he best fits one of the other categories that J. Kelsey Jones has outlined in this additional excerpt from his very informative article published by the Bradford County Historical Society of Towanda, Pennsylvania and entitled, Loyalist Plantations on the Susquehanna:

"This article will endeavor to give some insight into the Loyalist
families who resided on the Susquehanna during the American
Revolution. Settlement had begun on the upper Susquehanna River in
Pennsylvania prior to the American Revolution. The histories relate
that two families of Germans, also known as Palatines, from the
Schoharie Valley in New York, were settlers in May 1770, leaving
their homes in New York and removing down the Susquehanna River into
Pennsylvania. Rudolph Fox and his wife Catharine Elisabetha Miller
settled at Towanda and the Shoefelt family further south on the
river, the latter family removing to the West Branch of the
Susquehanna. Several more German families from the Mohawk, Schoharie,
and other German settlements in New York soon followed. Though this
was considered the interior of civilization, German settlers had
removed from Schoharie Creek, crossed the mountains and traveled down
the Susquehanna for Tulpehocken and Swartara in Pennsylvania at much
earlier dates, the first in 1722, fifty or more families in 1725, and
again in 1729.

Prior to, during, and after the American Revolution, the State of
Connecticut claimed a large portion of Pennsylvania, including that
portion that is now Bradford and Wyoming Counties through which the
Susquehanna River flows. Those settlers who attempted to obtain land
titles either secured title under the Susquehanna Company, which had
been formed in Connecticut for the purpose of settlement in the
Wyoming Valley and nearby lands or under Pennsylvania title. Others
had leasehold interests, some of which appeared to be ten-year
contracts with the landholder. Many others simply settled without
title, hoping for obtainment by possession or to secure title after
settlement. Pennsylvania had issued warrants for land interests
before the settlement by the Fox and Shoefelt families, as evidenced
by the warrant for Peter Hunt dated 3 April 1769 for 300 acres on the
Susquehanna River adjoining Adolph Wallrad "on this side of
Wialoosing" (Wyalusing).

Most of the settlers along the Susquehanna were farmers and built
homes along the river where they planted crops, often in already
cleared fields they found when arriving, that had been previously
cultivated by the Indians. They built barns and other storage
facilities, erected fences, and began the task of clearing more land.
The farms or plantations as they were known were productive on the
fertile soils of the Susquehanna River Valley.

Research into these families who were settling on the Susquehanna
reveals they were of various ethnic groups and from various locations
within the colonies. Several families were Germans from the Mohawk
and Schoharie Valleys in New York, a few were of French Huguenot
extraction from the Hudson Valley region, others were of Dutch
extraction from New York, others were New Englanders from
Connecticut, a few were from Sussex County, New Jersey and others
were Germans from settlements in southern Pennsylvania."
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William Flowers
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« Reply #10 on: September 27, 2009, 08:21:33 AM »

Thanks to Kelsey Jones who has just supplied me with the latest information he has collected on Jacob Teague:

"Jacob Teague b. c. 1743 German Flats, New York son of Andries Teague m. 15 Nov 1764 (Stone Arabia Reformed Church – “Jacob Deeck and Margretha Weberin) Anna Margaretha Weaver b. c. 1743 daughter of Andries Weaver and wife Catherine. Resided Tryon County, New York. Removed to Susquehanna River, resided on lots 18 and 52 in Putnam Township (Putnam Township was created as a Susquehanna Company township under Connecticut title and embraced the area of present Tunkhannock in Wyoming County, Pennsylvania). Lots 18 and 52 were west of Tunkhannock on the north side of the Susquehanna River. The creek flowing through both lots into the Susquehanna River is known as Tagues Creek. He appears as Jacob Tage on the 1776 assessment list of the Upper River District. Jacob appears as Jacob Take on a list of Captain William Caldwell’s Company of Rangers acknowledging full amount of pay from 24 Dec 1777 to 24 Oct 1778. This company contained many of those who were on the Susquehanna in the vicinity of present Bradford County and Wyoming Counties, Pennsylvania.

On a return dated 24 July to 24 Aug 1779 at Machish (Machiche) Jacob Teauge is listed with one man, one woman, one male child above age 10, two male children under age 10, one female child above age 10, four female children under age 10, 6 rations per day, arrived from Niagara 6th July. On a return dated 25 Sept to 24 Oct 1779 Jacob Teague appears with one man, one woman, two children over age 10, six children under age 10, from Niagara.

On “A Roll of the Age, Size, Country, and time of Service of the Sergeants, Corporals, Drummers, and privates of 2nd Battalion, Kings Royal Regiment, New York” signed by Major John Boss, received Quebec City 25 Apr 1783 appears the name Jacob Teague, age 40, 5’ 7”, born America, served 3 years.

Faced with overcrowded camps at Machiche and Sorel, Loyalist settlements were needed in Lower and Upper Canada. On the 9th June 1784, three hundred and fifteen men, women and children, together with a unit of soldiers embarked on three vessels, the Brig St. Peter, the Snow Liberty and the Brig Polly. Jacob’s name does not appear on the list, but was perhaps on one of the vessels. They sailed into the St Lawrence River, past Gaspé, into Chaleur Bay, landing at Paspebiac.

Jacob Teague, Cooper, appears on the 17 Aug 1784 Paspébiac Lot Drawing List, along with his wife, a 13 year-old son, and daughters: 15, 12, 11, and 10. Andrew Teague, drummer, was the next person on the lot drawing list.

Jacob appears on a list of settlers at Carlisle, Bay of Chaleur (New Carlisle, Quebec), 1785, muster roll no. 21. Granted lot 29 fronting on Chaleur Bay and encompassing Teagues Brook.

Jacob Tague appears on a 13 Jan 1786 muster roll of Cox (New Carlisle) with one wife, one male age 15 and four females ages 12, 13, 9, and 1, cooper, lot 15 in Hopetown Township, signed his name.

I, Jacob Tague, Farmer residing at Lake Osega before this unhappy Dissention in America in the Province of New York County Tryon was Driven from my property On account of my Loyalty to his Majesty and atached to the British Government and Join’d the British Armey Under Cornel John Butler at Nigara the first of April 1777 and served under as Privit Solder in Capt. Butlers Companey as a loylest.

Jacob Tage

10 April 1786


In 1786 Jacob Teague of New Carlisle filed a supporting affadavit for the loyalist claim of Mary Beebe Pearson, testifying that her former husband, Joshua Beebe, had lost 300 acres on the Susquehanna River.

Claim of Jacob Tague, no. 235, 1 Aug 1787 Quebec, late of Tryon County, New York Province. Says he resided on Mal Bay in the service of the Govt. in 1784-4. He was born at the German Flatts, Mohawk River, in 1775 (must be incorrectly recorded or transcribed). He lived in Tryon County as a Farmer. He was required by the Americans to sign an association but he positively refused and was obliged to fly in 1777 to Niagara. He then enlisted in Butler's Rangers where he served 2 years. He then enlisted in Sir John Johnson's & served until the end of the War. Produces his discharge from each Regt. He now resides at Carlisle Bay. Property - 200 acres of Land on Deed from Augustine Prevost. He purchased 9 years before the War. He pd. £40 York pr. Hundred acres for it. He cleared 15 acres & built a House, a Stable, & Barn. Thinks he could have sold for £125 H. Cury. Stock, Furniture, &c., all taken by the Americans. Produces affidavit of Mary Stet, 16th March, 1786, to good character, to her having been at his log house, and that he had some Improvements on his farm.

Jacob m. 19 Sept 1796 at Bathurst, Gloucester County, New Brunswick, Charlotte Thebeau b. 29 Dec 1776 Nepesiguit, New Brunswick daughter of Mathurin Thebeau (Thebeault) and Catherine Duval. Jacob and Charlotte resided about eleven miles east of Bathurst at Janeville on 275 acres. A stream running through the property was known as Teague’s Brook and empties into the Bay of Chaleur. Jacob Teague and several others were granted land at Alnwick, Northumberland County, New Brunswick in 1812 (Grant #615 vol F, pg 97) consisting of a tract encompassing 6,160 acres extending from the Bass River to Janeville.

Jacob d. 24 Mar 1824 New Bandon, Gloucester County, New Brunswick, Canada.

Charlotte m. 1834 at Paspebiack, Bonaventure County, Quebec, Jean Baptiste Bourdignan.

Children of Jacob and Margaret:

1.  Andreas Teague b. 21 Mar baptized 5 May 1766 (Stone Arabia Reformed Church).

2.  Catharina Teague b. 11 Oct baptized 24 Oct 1767 (Stone Arabia Reformed Church) m. Samuel Clark.

3.  Anna Maria Teague baptized 26 Aug 1769 (Stone Arabia Reformed Church – birth date not given only the baptism date).

4.  son b. c. 1771 (male child under age 10 in August 1779 and age 13 on 17 Aug 1784).

5.  Margaret Teague b. c. 1772 (one of four daughters under age 10 in August 1779; age 12 on 17 August 1784 and age 13 on 13 January 1786).

6.  daughter b. c. 1773) (one of four daughters under age 10 in August 1779, age 11 on 17 August 1784 and age 12 on 13 January 1786).

7.  daughter b. c. 1775 (one of four daughters under age 10 in August 1779, age 10 on 17 August 1784 and age 9 on 13 January 1786).

8.  son (male child under age 10 in August 1779)

9.  Christina b. 15 Aug 1778 baptized 15 Aug 1781 (Trois Rivieres Protestant Church).

10.  Anne Teague b. c. 1785 (13 January 1786 age 1 and baptized January 1796 age 10).

Children of Jacob and Charlotte:

1.  David Teague.
2.  Sarah Teague.
3.  Catherine Teague m. 21 Oct 1819 Julien Loiselle of Paspébiac, Québec.
4.  Nicolas Teague bp. in Oct 1801.
5.  Pierre Teague bp. 14 Jul 1805.
6.  Joseph Teague b. 15 Jun 1805.
7.  Jean-Baptist Teague b. 15 Nov 1812.

Second Generation:

1. Andreas Teague b. 21 Mar 1766 appears as Andrew Teague on a 13 Jan 1786 muster roll of Cox (New Carlisle), farmer, lot 57, signed by mark, no others in household. Andrew enumerated in the 1825 census of New Carlisle with himself in the household. John Andrew Tague of Hope Township d. 27 Mar 1843 age 87 (New Carlisle and Paspebiac Anglican Church record).

 

3.  Anna Maria Teague baptized 26 Aug 1769, known as Mary Ann m. Joseph Goodwillie b. 3 Apr 1751 Leslie, Tanshall, Fifeshire, Scotland. Joseph d. Jan 1808 and Mary Ann d. 1843 Barnet, Vermont.

 

Mary Goodwillie b. c. 1786 New Carlisle, Quebec.

Margaret Goodwillie b. 7 Aug 1787 New Carlisle,

James Goodwillie b. c. 1792 Barnet, Vermont.

Joseph Goodwillie b. 30 June 1795 Barnet.

Elizabeth Goodwillie b. c. 2 July 1797 Barnet.

Christian Goodwillie b. c. 1799 Barnet.

Nancy Goodwillie b. 6 Feb 1802 Barnet.

Isabel Goodwillie b. 24 Aug 1803 Barnet.

George Goodwillie b. c. 1805 Barnet.

Mary Ann Goodwillie b. c. 1807 Barnet.

5.  Margaret Teague b. c. 1772 m. David Smith. In a land petition of Duncan McRae of Hopetown, dated 3 Aug 1820, it is stated: "Opposition by David Smith Sr. of Hope Township, Bonaventure Couty, Quebec for the above mentioned Lot No 12 said apparent acting in this behalf as for himself For his wife Margaret Tegg, who claimed the said land by right of inheritance from her mother Margaret Weaver." Margaret d. 16 Mar 1867 New Carlisle, Bonaventure County, Quebec.

 

Richard Smith b. c. 1791.

Margaret Elizabeth Smith b. c. 1794

David Smith b. c .1796.

Mary Smith b. c. 1798.

James Smith b. c. 1805.

Andrew Smith b. c. 1807.

Rachel Smith b. c. 1808.

John Alexander Smith b. c. 1809.

Sarah Smith b. c. 1811.

Adam Smith b. c. 1815."
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William Flowers
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« Reply #11 on: November 07, 2009, 12:34:16 PM »

Hi All
Just found another confirmation as to where Jacob Teague settled.

I happened upon "AN ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA, By WILLIAM H. EGLE" pub 1876 pg.1176
Tunkhannock was the third of the original certified towns, .............. The oldest settlers of Tunkhannock, as far as known, were Zebulon Marcy, who lived near where the tannery now stands, and Christopher Avery, who lived on the flat on the south side of the creek. Philip Buck, a German, sent here by the Pennamites in 1773, lived upon the land of Christopher Avery, but afterwards, in company with two others, settled opposite the mouth of Bowman's creek. Abraham and Adam Wartman were also two Germans sent here by the Pennamites in the same year that Philip Buck came. They settled near the mouth of Tunkhannock creek. Nicholas Phillips settled near the creek in the same year ; Jacob Teague settled about two miles above the mouth of the creek, in 1774; and Increase Billings near the forks of the north and south branches, in the year 1773......

There are also a couple mentions of John Secord being about "Two miles above the Tunkhannock"
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William Flowers
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Posts: 505


« Reply #12 on: November 08, 2009, 05:16:35 AM »

Hi All
Just found another confirmation as to where Jacob Teague settled.

I happened upon "AN ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA, By WILLIAM H. EGLE" pub 1876 pg.1176
Tunkhannock was the third of the original certified towns, .............. The oldest settlers of Tunkhannock, as far as known, were Zebulon Marcy, who lived near where the tannery now stands, and Christopher Avery, who lived on the flat on the south side of the creek. Philip Buck, a German, sent here by the Pennamites in 1773, lived upon the land of Christopher Avery, but afterwards, in company with two others, settled opposite the mouth of Bowman's creek. Abraham and Adam Wartman were also two Germans sent here by the Pennamites in the same year that Philip Buck came. They settled near the mouth of Tunkhannock creek. Nicholas Phillips settled near the creek in the same year ; Jacob Teague settled about two miles above the mouth of the creek, in 1774; and Increase Billings near the forks of the north and south branches, in the year 1773......

There are also a couple mentions of John Secord being about "Two miles above the Tunkhannock"

This is great stuff. Thanks!
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William Flowers
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